Introduction to Single Camera: Build a Tower, Build a Team

DVP Week 1

In our first session for Digital Video Production (DVP) we were introduced to the Spaghetti Challenge, a great team building exercise that encourages participants to build the tallest free-standing structure, which must be capable of supporting a marsh mallow. It must be made out of 20 sticks of spaghetti, a length of tape and a length of string. Sounds easy right? Afraid not, it’s surprisingly difficult to complete successfully in a short time frame. Check out this You Tube video of Tom Wujec talking about the “challenge“.

My group failed to create an adequate tower in the time allotted. Due to snapping spaghetti sticks and weak supports, our effort crashed and burned on the brink of glory.

However, there were many successful towers dotted around the room, coming from one or two other groups. The value of the exercise was in the practical application of the task and how we all individually gave our ideas to the team and were forced to work together under tight time constraints. Making films and other unrelated areas of work and the challenges of life are often like this. There is a challenge to be met, we must work with what little we have and most importantly, we must work together for the best possible outcome.

I personally enjoyed hearing the ideas of others and the positive atmosphere a team building exercise like this brings about. It is a good chance to meet others that you may not have otherwise met and to hear and share ideas with them, creating instant comradery through imposed necessity.

Producing a film is a difficult task; it requires a lot of hard work and dedication. It cannot be done without a team of people working together to the same ends. In constructing a spaghetti tower, I learned the value of planning, prototyping and facilitation; a necessary list of skills needed to implement a worthwhile product.

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About Roulette Revolver

Currently a first year undergraduate in Film & Media Studies.
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